Illegal Mining in 3 Protected Areas of Venezuela

New! Third report | Illegal Mining, Guerrillas & Disease in the Upper Orinoco-Casiquiare Biosphere Reserve

Read the full report in English released by SOSOrinoco on November 7, 2019 “Illegal Mining, Guerrillas & Disease: The Revolution’s Legacy to the Indigenous Peoples of the Upper Orinoco-Casiquiare Biosphere Reserve in Venezuela’s Amazonia”

Lea el informe completo en español publicado por SOSOrinoco el 7 de noviembre, 2019 “Minería, guerrilla y enfermedades: El legado de la revolución a los indígenas de la Reserva de Biosfera Alto Orinoco-Casiquiare, Amazonas venezolano”

See Story Map on Upper Orinoco Casiquiare Biosphere Reserve Report

Reserva de Biosfera Alto Orinoco-Casiquiare, Amazonas venezolano | Minería, guerrilla y enfermedades: El legado de la revolución a los indígenas del Alto Orinoco

Second report | Illegal Mining in Yapacana National Park (Amazonas, Venezuela)

Read the full report in English released by SOSOrinoco on March 15, 2019 “Gold Mining Activity in Yapacana National Park, Venezuela’s Amazon Region | A National, International & Geopolitical Matter of Extreme Urgency for the Environment”

Lea el informe completo en español publicado por SOSOrinoco el 15 de marzo, 2019: “La Minería Aurífera en el Parque Nacional Yapacana, Amazonas Venezolano | Un caso de extrema urgencia ambiental y geopolítica, nacional e internacional”

See Story Map on Yapacana National Park report:

PN Yapacana: Un caso de extrema urgencia ambiental y geopolítica

Yapacana NP: A National, International & Geopolitical Matter of Extreme Urgency for the Environment

First Report | Illegal Gold Mining in Canaima National Park (World Heritage Site)

Read the full report in English submitted by SOSOrinoco in July 2018 to UNESCO and IUCN on “The Current Gold Mining Situation in Canaima National Park: A World Heritage Site in Venezuela”

Lea el reporte completo en español entregado por SOSOrinoco en Julio 2018 a UNESCO y UICN sobre “La Situación Actual de Minería Aurífera en el Parque Nacional Canaima: Sitio de Patrimonio Mundial en Venezuela”

See Story Map on Canaima National Park report:

Canaima: Patrimonio Mundial en Peligro (Español)

Canaima: World Heritage Site in Danger (English) 

Destruction in Venezuela’s Amazonia and Orinoquia

A lot has been said and denounced these past few years about drug trafficking, human rights abuses, and lately the humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, but sadly little about the disaster in the Southern region of Venezuela makes it to the mainstream media and social media.

This region, comprised of states of Amazonas, Apure, Bolivar, Delta Amacuro, encompasses 60% of the national territory and only 10% of the population. It shares borders with Brazil, Colombia, and Guyana Esequiba – a territory administered by Guyana and claimed by Venezuela –  possesses vast quantities of natural riches, and is the habitat of at least 34 indigenous and tribal peoples of Venezuela.

Historically, this region has alternated between neglect and attention on the part of Venezuelan rulers, both of which have had negative and positive results. During the past 20 years, the Chavista narcostate has shown fluctuating levels of attention particularly when both Chavez and Maduro were keen to find new sources of money.  During this period, the government has tried to implement 6 programs in partnership with various countries – the latest one being the Arco Minero plan announced on February 24, 2016 – to exploit the vast gold, diamond, coltan and other mineral reserves. The results have been catastrophic both for the region, its people, the environment and will probably have tragic lasting – if not irreversible – effects on Venezuela and beyond.

Call to Action

At this time when the international community is actively denouncing and holding accountable the Maduro regime for human rights abuses, the mounting humanitarian and democratic crises, the environmental and human rights abuses that are occurring in the Southern region of Venezuela should be added to the long list.

WHAT YOU CAN DO:

Find out more about Project SOS Orinoco here.